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Biology and Marine Biology (Mailing)

Phone

  • Information: 796-6200

Fax

  • Fax: 796-6447

Address


11066 Auke Lake Way (AND1)
Juneau, AK 99801

Juneau Faculty

Sherry Tamone

Professor of Biology, Natural Sciences Department Chair

Phone: 796-6599Fax: 796-6447

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences

Anderson Bldg, 205A, Juneau Campus

Juneau Campus

Education

Ph.D research conducted at the Bodega Marine Laboratory

Research

My studies are concerned with the role of hormones in regulating physiological processes in decapod Crustacea (crabs and lobsters). Hormones are chemical mediators that regulate physiological processes such as growth, reproduction, and osmoregulation. I am interested in the mechanism by which hormones such as ecdysteroids, methyl farnesoate, and molt-inhibiting hormone regulate growth and reproduction in decapod crustaceans. The majority of crustaceans that I study are commercially important crabs. These include Dungeness crab, Cancer magister, snow crab, Chionoecetes opilio, and king crab, Paralithodes camtschaticus.

Ecdysteroids are crustacean hormones that function to regulate the molt cycle and therefore the growth of these animals. Methyl farnesoate is a sesquiterpenoid hormone derived from the mandibular organ that functions in both reproduction and growth. Methyl farnesoate also may be critical during crustacean larval development and morphogenesis. Methyl farnesoate is structurally similar to the insect juvenile hormones, which regulate insect development.

Other studies related to crustacean physiology involve the effect of endogenous crustacean hormones on ectoparasites. Specifically, I have an interest in how hormones (ecdysteroids, methyl farnesoate) can be exploited by certain parasites. The model for these studies is the infection of the Dungeness crab, Cancer magister by the nemertean worm, Carcinonemertes errans.

Curriculum vitae

Publications

Courses Taught

  • B105 & B106 Fundamentals of Biology
  • B305 Invertebrate Zoology
  • B310 Animal Physiology
  • B375 Current Topics in Biology
  • B415 Physiology of Marine Organisms
  • B498 Research in Crustacean Biology

David Tallmon

Professor of Biology

Phone: 796-6330Fax: 796-6447

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences

Anderson Bldg, 205D, Juneau Campus

Juneau Campus

Education

  • Ph.D. 2001, University of Montana
  • M.S. 1995, University of Montana
  • B.A. 1992, University of California Santa Cruz

Research

My general interests are in evolution, ecology, and conservation biology.  My focus is on understanding the evolutionary and ecological dynamics of natural populations using demographic and genetic models, molecular genetic data, and field data.  I have long-standing interest in combining population genomics and demographic information to infer important evolutionary and demographic parameters for wild populations.  More recently, my post-docs and I have focused upon the role of phenotypic plasticity in adaptation.

I have used models based on likelihood and approximate Bayesian computation to infer demographic vital rates or effective population size with the goal of providing useful results and tools for conservation and evolutionary biology.  As an example, some collaborators and I have recently developed an approach to infer effective size of a population using a single sample of microsatellite data and approximate Bayesian computation. 

We focus on a number of different taxa in my lab, with current work on a handful of terrestrial and marine vertebrates and invertebrates, including: coastrange sculpins, giant Pacific octopus, red king crab, spruce grouse, file dogwinkles, ringed seals and boreal toads.  I enjoy working with students who are highly-motivated, broadly interested in evolution and conservation, and focused on understanding population-level process using descriptive and manipulative approaches.  Prospective grad students should read more here.

Publications

Curriculum vitae 

Affiliations

  • Society for the Study of Evolution
  • Ecological Society of America
  • Society for Conservation Biology
  • Wildlife Society of America
  • American Fisheries Society

Courses Taught

  • B105 Fundamentals of Biology I
  • B106 Fundamentals of Biology II
  • B271 Ecology
  • B373 Conservation Biology
  • B375 Current Topics in Biology
  • B482 Evolution
  • B492 Biology Seminar
  • B498 Research in Biology
  • B396 Field Studies in Behavior and Ecology

Other

Other Interests: telemark skiing, hiking, soccer and basketball

Michael O. Navarro

Assistant Professor of Marine Fisheries

Phone: 796-6293

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences

Anderson Bldg, 205 F, Juneau Campus

Juneau Campus

http://www.uas.alaska.edu/arts_sciences/

Education

  • Ph.D., Biological Oceanography: Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego
  • M.S., Biological Science: California State University Fullerton
  • B.S., Biology: University of California Los Angeles

Courses Taught

  • BIOL 110 Introduction to Fisheries
  • BIOL 393 Biological Oceanography
  • BIOL 362 Genetics
  • BIOL 105 Fundamental Biology

Carolyn A Bergstrom

Associate Professor of Marine Biology

Phone: 796-6582Fax: 796-6447

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences

Anderson Bldg, 205B, Juneau Campus

Juneau Campus

Education

  • B.S. 1995, University of Arizona (Tucson, Arizona)
  • Ph.D. 2002, University of Victoria (Victoria, British Columbia)
  • 2003-2007, Alberta Ingenuity Postdoctoral Fellow, Bamfield Marine Science Center
  • 2008-2009, International Polar Year Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Alaska Southeast

Research

How does natural selection maintain phenotypic variation within marine species? What role do ecological interactions like predation and competition play? My research interests are broadly concerned with these questions. More specifically, I investigate (1) how ecological interactions in the ocean orchestrate relationships between form, function, and fitness, (2) the ecofunctional implications of bilateral asymmetries, and (3) the impact glacial melt-water has on estuarine fish communities. I explore these topics with a variety of techniques, including morphometrics and behavioral observations, field experiments, multivariate statistics, stable isotope analyses, and experimental assessment of fitness.

I currently have two main research projects underway. The first of these is the evolution of body asymmetry in flatfish. Flatfish exhibit remarkably derived body morphology. They undergo metamorphosis as pelagic larvae, where one eye migrates over the dorsal midline so that both eyes are on the same side of the head, and they lie on the ocean floor, eyed-side facing up. While the vast majority of the 715 flatfish species contain all left-eyed or all right-eyed individuals, 7 species contain both morphs. To date, we don't have a good understanding of the evolutionary trajectory flatfish took to become asymmetric, or the significance of asymmetry direction. One polymorphic species, the starry flounder, exhibits a cline in the north Pacific in the relative frequency of left- vs. right-eyed individuals, and the two morphs show evidence of ecological segregation. It is one of the first demonstrations of the ecological significance of polymorphism in a marine species, and contributes to our understanding how asymmetry evolved across the flatfish order. 

My second current research project involves how glacial melt water affects fish living in estuaries. Glacial estuaries differ in habitat characteristics from rain-fed estuaries, including temperature, sediment composition, turbidity, and water chemistry. In a collaborative project funded by EPSCoR Alaska and Alaska Sea Grant, we are comparing community structure of fishes found across estuaries that differ in their glacial influence. Differences in these communities will inform predictions of how marine fishes will respond to predicted increases in melting rate of glaciers that flow into our oceans.


Select publications
Curriculum vitae

Courses Taught

  • BIOL 215 Introduction to Marine Biology
  • BIOL 106 Fundamentals of Biology II
  • BIOL 427 Introduction to Ichthyology
  • BIOL 481 Marine Ecology
  • BIOL 355 Experimental Design and Data Analysis
  • BIOL 441 Animal Behavior

Heidi Pearson

Associate Professor of Marine Biology

Phone: 796-6271Fax: 796-6447

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences

Anderson Bldg, Rm 205C, Juneau Campus

Juneau Campus

http://www.uas.alaska.edu/arts_sciences/naturalsciences/biology

Education

Ph.D., Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 2008
B.S., Duke University, Durham, NC, 1998

Curriculum vitae (.pdf)

Research


Go here to learn about my marine mammal research lab, BREACH, and read the latest updates from the field.


Courses Taught

  • BIOL 311 Communicating Science 
  • BIOL 375 Discussions in Marine Mammalogy
  • BIOL 111 & 112 Human Anatomy and Physiology 
  • BIOL 384 Marine Mammalogy 
  •  BIOL 380 Marine Ornithology and Herpetology 
  • BIOL 353 Tropical Marine and Coastal Ecology 

Susan L. Kendig

Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Phone: 796-6275Fax: 796-6447

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences

Anderson Bldg, Rm. 205G, Juneau Campus

Juneau Campus

http://www.uas.alaska.edu/arts_sciences/naturalsciences

Education

  • M.S., Chemistry: University of California Santa Cruz
  • B.S., Chemistry: University of California Santa Cruz
  • B.S.N., Nursing: Linfield College

Research

Use of carbon free-radicals in stereoselective synthesis of amino acids.

Courses Taught

  • CHEM 100 – Introduction to Chemical Science
  • CHEM 103 – Introduction to General Chemistry
  • CHEM 104 – Survey of Organic and Biochemistry
  • CHEM 105L & 106L – General Chemistry I & II Labs
  • BIOL 111 & 112 – Human Anatomy & Physiology I & II
  • BIOL 375 – Special Topics

Ashwin Sreenivasan

Assistant Professor of Marine Biology

Phone: 796-6586

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Biology

Anderson Bldg, 205G, Juneau Campus

Juneau Campus

Sitka Faculty

Marnie Chapman

Professor of Biology

Phone: 747-7702

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences

Sitka Campus

Education

M.S. Biology University of St. Joseph (Focus: Human Biology) 2008
M.A. Biology Humboldt State University (Focus: Intertidal Biology) 1992
B.A. Zoology Humboldt State University 1983
Graduate coursework at Friday Harbor Laboratory and Bamfield Marine Station

Special Recognition:

UA President’s Award for Outstanding Distance Educator in Alaska (2001)
UAS Faculty Excellence Award Sitka Campus (2012)

Courses Taught

BIOL 111 Human Anatomy & Physiology I
BIOL 112 Human Anatomy & Physiology II

Past Courses Taught:

Microbiology, Natural History of Alaska, Intertidal Biology, General Biology, Biology & Society,
General Zoology, Alaska Naturalist Program; Science for K-8 Teachers

Biography

I’m originally from Northern California and lived in Bethel and Skagway before moving to Sitka in 1992. I enjoy helping students build a firm foundation in the topic that will serve them well in their careers. I am active in the Human Anatomy and Physiology Society (HAPS).  As part of HAPS I helped develop standards for undergraduate human anatomy and physiology courses taught in the US and Canada. I am committed to quality eLearning opportunities and developed and delivered the first distance science courses offered by UAS. As Sitka’s lab director I currently help oversee the lab support portion of UAS Sitka Distance Science courses which have grown to involve multiple faculty members and currently serve over 200 students each semester.  I believe it is important to give back to my community by doing what I can to enrich science literacy, assist in community-based scientific research, and help create science-related opportunities for everyone, especially K-12 students.

Community Projects:

  • Served as an invited researcher for Scientist in the Schools programs at elementary, middle, and high school levels.
  • Helped establish science clubs at the local elementary and middle school that give kids a chance to interact with scientists and collect data for meaningful research projects.
  • Found opportunities for K-12 students to meet and work with scientists from the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, UCSF, UAF and Project Budburst.
  • Assisted with marine invertebrate identification for community BioBlitzes and provided intertidal ecology expertise for many community organizations.
  • Involved in a project to revisit historical work done in Sitka by Ed (Doc) Ricketts and link it to modern intertidal survey protocols.

I am particularly interested in the ecology and functional anatomy of intertidal organisms, especially with respect to predator-prey relationships.  I am also very involved in marine invasive issues and research, particularly with respect to invasive tunicates. I am a member of the Alaska Marine Invasive Species subcommittee and the Didemnum vexillum Rapid Response Team.

Jan Straley

Professor of Marine Biology

Phone: 747-7779

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences

Sitka Campus

Education

B.S. University of Washington Seattle

M.S. University of Alaska Fairbanks

Kitty LaBounty

Assistant Professor of Biology

Phone: 747-9432

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences

Sitka Campus

Education

B.S. University of Washington

M.S. University of California at Riverside 

Paul Bahna

Assistant Professor of Biology

Phone: 747-7749

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences

Sitka Campus

Education

M.D., DPH, Ain Shams University, Egypt 

M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas

Jon Martin

Assistant Professor of Biology

Phone: 747-7752

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences

Sitka Campus

Education

B.S., M.S. Portland State University

Ketchikan Faculty

Matthew Pawlus

Assistant Professor of Science

Phone: 228-4557

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Biology

Paul Bldg, 510, Ketchikan Campus

Ketchikan Campus

Staff

Sara Caldwell

Biology Lab Technician

Phone: 796-6316Second Phone: 723-8081

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences

Anderson Bldg, Rm 310, Juneau Campus

Juneau Campus

Trevor Fritz

Chemistry Lab Technician

Phone: 796-6199Fax: 796-6447

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences

Anderson Bldg, Rm. 309, Juneau Campus

Juneau Campus

 
 

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